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methods of resolving mismatches between place structures and number of overt sumti


posts: 149

John E Clifford scripsit:

> Right; but at the same time they call the place
> structure of {botpi} bloated, that is, containing
> unnecessary places. If {botpi} is not "bottle"
> because of the lid place, then it cannot be
> called bloated, since every place in its
> structure is essential to it. You can't have it
> both ways and the thrust seems to be generally in
> the direction of calling {botpi} bloated. Hence,
> {botpi} ought to be compatible with current
> {botpi fo zi'o}.

I agree with all but the last sentence, which should be
"Hence people who talk of bloated place structures
should put up or shut up."

> Sorry, if you change the place structure, you
> change the meaning. With the same meaning, you
> are stuck with the same place structure.

+1

 
> This simply means that you do not — for whatever
> reason — like that place structure. So change
> it — that seems to be what bpfk is all about.
> The place structure — by your claim — is (by
> definition) exactly right for the concept it
> represents. Anything else would be insane (well,
> wrong any way).

+1

 
My take is that zi'o semantics are never obvious or clear-cut:
using zi'o generates a novel predicate just as much as making
tanru does, and its meaning cannot be determined by fiat,
any more than tanru meaning can. There may be things that
mamta be zi'o, or gerku be zi'o, or botpi be fo zi'o, but
only speaker consensus can say what they may be.

--
John Cowan cowan@ccil.org www.ccil.org/~cowan www.reutershealth.com
I must confess that I have very little notion of what s. 4 of the British
Trade Marks Act, 1938
is intended to convey, and particularly the sentence
of 253 words, as I make them, which constitutes sub-section 1. I doubt if
the entire statute book could be successfully searched for a sentence of
equal length which is of more fuliginous obscurity. --MacKinnon LJ, 1940

 


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